Archive for the ‘Industry News’ Category

9
Jun

McDermott Re-Introduces Legislation To Curb Carbon Dioxide Emissions

Press Release:  WASHINGTON, DC – Jim McDermott (D, WA-7) has re-introduced the Managed Carbon Price Act of 2014 (H.R. 4754) to reduce harmful carbon dioxide emissions and to help American industry transition to clean sources of energy.

“Climate change is real and increasing evidence indicates that its impacts are now being felt across the United States – in our polluted air, warming oceans, stressed ecosystems and increasingly destructive weather patterns,” said Congressman McDermott.  “To secure our planet’s future, we must curb harmful carbon dioxide emissions.  To drive the American economy, we must move away from fossil fuels and develop clean, inexpensive, renewable energy sources.  The Managed Carbon Price Act of 2014 is designed to produce results in both of these critical areas.” Read More…

12
May

Washington Cleantech Makes a Mark at the World’s Largest Industrial Trade Fair

There were 180,000 participants this year at the world’s largest industrial trade fair:  The Hanover Messe.  This is a report from this year’s show in Hanover, Germany, April 7-11, 2014, written by Andrew Crowder, Business Development Manager, Washington State Department of Commerce.

German Chancellor Angela Merkel

German Chancellor Angela Merkel addresses the Opening Plenary Session of the Hanover Messe

Summary

The Hanover Messe is the world’s largest international trade show for industrial technology. Over the years, it has evolved into a major industrial, political, and policy event. Even years, such as 2014, are smaller years for the Messe, because the Wind Energy and Motion, Drive and Automation sub-shows are not held. Even so, there were approximately 5,000 exhibitors and 180,000 attendees over the five days of the Messe, with over 100 countries represented. Ninety-three per cent of the attendees were business visitors. The primary language was German, but English was a close second. Read More…

12
May

Global renewable energy jobs count tops 6.5 million – IRENA

Approximately 6.5 million peopled were employed by the renewable energy industry worldwide last year, according to the latest figures from the International Renewable Energy Agency (IRENA).

The Abu Dhabi-based agency, which represents over 150 countries and was launched in 2009 with a goal of providing a renewable energy-focused partner to the International Energy Agency (IEA), will today publish Renewable Energy and Jobs – Annual Review 2014, a comprehensive report detailing how employment across the sector rose from 5.7 million in 2012 to 6.5 million last year.

“With 6.5 million people directly or indirectly employed in renewable energy, the sector is proving that it is no longer a niche, it has become a significant employer worldwide,” said IRENA Director-General Adnan Z. Amin.

He added that the trends uncovered by the report would prove “crucial to developing policy that strengthens job growth in this important sector of the economy”.

The report confirms China’s position as the world’s largest renewable energy market with much of the new job creation coming from the country’s booming solar and wind sectors. IRENA estimated that solar PV installations in China grew five-fold between 2011 and 2013, cementing the country’s position as the world’s largest renewable energy employer with an estimated 2.6 million jobs. It is followed in the renewable energy employment league table by the EU, with around 1.2 million jobs, Brazil with over 890,000 jobs, and the US with 625,000 jobs.

renewable-energy-jobs

The solar PV industry enjoyed a particularly strong year, according to the report, and now employs over 2.2 million people globally. It was followed by the liquid biofuels sector, which employed over 1.4 million people and the wind industry with over 800,000 employees.

“Surging demand for solar PV in China and Japan has increased employment in the installation sector and eased some PV module over-supply concerns,” said Rabia Ferroukhi, heading the Knowledge, Policy and Finance division at IRENA and lead author of the report. “Consequently some Chinese manufacturers are now adding capacity.

The review will be officially presented at the latest international Clean Energy Ministerial meeting in Seoul, South Korea, which will see energy minister from 23 countries discuss measures to further accelerate the deployment of renewables.

The results are likely to be seized upon by advocates of clean energy as further evidence of renewables position as a mainstream energy source. However, it also comes in the same week as the IEA published a fresh report warning that while a number of emerging economies have made impressive progress in accelerating investment in clean energy a slowdown in some mature markets means the “overall picture of progress remains bleak”.

The report argues that while renewable energy is commanding an ever greater share of the global energy mix, the continuation of current demand trends that saw overall electricity emissions increase by 75 per cent between 1990 and 2011 would “dangerously drive up electricity-related emissions”.

6
May

US National Climate Assessment: Northwest Forecast

The U.S. National Climate Assessment forecast for Northwest suggest significant climate changes in the years to come.  The report, released on May 6, 2014, was issued on behalf of the National Science and Technology Council and the U.S. Global Change Research Program.  It is the Third National Climate Assessment: Climate Change Impacts in the United States.

Section 21 focuses on the Northwest.  The Convening Lead Authors are:

  • Philip Mote, Oregon State University
  • Amy K. Snover, University of Washington

The Lead Authors authors are:

  • Susan Capalbo, Oregon State University
  • Sanford D. Eigenbrode, University of Idaho
  • Patty Glick, National Wildlife Federation
  • Jeremy Littell, U.S. Geological Survey
  • Richard Raymondi, Idaho Department of Water Resources
  • Spencer Reeder, Cascadia Consulting Group

The authors conclusion on the future of the Northwest are summarized as follows:

  1. Changes in the timing of streamflow related to changing snowmelt are already observed and will
    continue, reducing the supply of water for many competing demands and causing far-reaching
    ecological and socioeconomic consequences.
  2. In the coastal zone, the effects of sea level rise, erosion, inundation, threats to infrastructure and
    habitat, and increasing ocean acidity collectively pose a major threat to the region.
  3. The combined impacts of increasing wildfire, insect outbreaks, and tree diseases are already
    causing widespread tree die-off and are virtually certain to cause additional forest mortality by
    the 2040s and long-term transformation of forest landscapes.  Under higher emissions scenarios,
    extensive conversion of subalpine forests to other forest types is projected by the 2080s.
  4. While the agriculture sector’s technical ability to adapt to changing conditions can offset some
    adverse impacts of a changing climate, there remain critical concerns for agriculture with respect
    to costs of adaptation, development of more climate resilient technologies and management, and
    availability and timing of water.

 

 

21
Mar

Imre Gyuk Presents to the WCTA

Richard Locke, Washington State Department of Commerce

Richard Locke, Washington State Department of Commerce

Russ Weed, UniEnergy Technologies

Russ Weed, UniEnergy Technologies

Audience at the Imre Gyuk talk, March 20, 2014

WCTA Audience at the Imre Gyuk talk, March 20, 2014

Imre Gyuk, US Department of Energy

Imre Gyuk, US Department of Energy

Imre Gyuk, US Department of Energy

Imre Gyuk, US Department of Energy

Some pictures from the event.  More to come….

5
Nov

Crafting a better enzyme cocktail to turn plants into fuel faster

Battelle / PNNLScientists looking to create a potent blend of enzymes to transform materials like corn stalks and wood chips into fuels have developed a test that should turbocharge their efforts.

The new research is part of a worldwide effort to create fuels from plants that are plentiful and aren’t part of the food supply. It’s possible to do this today, but the process is costly, laborious and lengthy. The findings by chemists and colleagues at the Department of Energy’s Pacific Northwest National Laboratory open the possibility that laboratory research that now takes months could be reduced to days, and that scientists will be able to assess more options for biofuel development than is possible today.

“The ultimate goal is to begin with a plant material like corn stalks, for instance, and to subject it to a cocktail of enzymes that would convert those plants to fuel,” said chemist Aaron Wright, who led the PNNL team. “It takes a series of steps to do that, and the cost has to come down if these fuels are to compete seriously with traditional hydrocarbon-based fuels.”

Wright’s team developed a way to measure the activity of each of the ingredients simultaneously, as well as the mixture overall. Instead of needing to run a series of experiments, each focusing on a separate enzyme, the team runs one experiment and tracks precisely how each of dozens of enzymes reacts to changing conditions.

“Identifying exactly which enzymes are doing most of the work you need done is crucial for making this an economical process,” said Wright. “We’re trying to keep tabs on the precise activity of every enzyme as each goes through a very complex process, as conditions like temperature and pH vary, to measure their activity through each stage.”

27
Sep

Evaluation of Comprehensive GHG Emissions Reduction Programs Outside of Washington

This report examines potential GHG reduction policies implemented in other jurisdictions, and considers their applicability to Washington. Two broad categories of policies are presented: comprehensive economy-wide efforts and sector-specific or technology-specific programs. The coverage of GHG emissions regulated in comprehensive carbon pricing programs can involve virtually the entire economy of the host jurisdiction. However, these programs vary in how pricing is imposed, in some cases constraining the quantity of emissions under a cap and trade regime, and in others directly setting the price of GHG emissions with a carbon tax. Sector-specific or technology-specific programs target discrete sources of emissions, or activities that drive emissions, and can together form a portfolio that is comprehensive. These policies may target electricity generation, transportation fuels, or any other GHG-intensive sector of the economy.

Table 2. Qualitative summary of potential GHG reduction policies

Policy

Magnitude of Potential Emissions Reductions

Net Economy-Wide Financial Impact on Washington Consumers and Businesses

Opportunity to Increase in-state energy production and expenditures

Opportunity for new infra-structure and jobs in clean tech and energy efficiency

Cap and Trade

High

Uncertaina

Medium

Mediumb

Carbon Tax

High

Uncertaina

Medium

Mediumb

Low Carbon Fuel Standard

High

Negative

High

High

Zero Emissions Vehicle Mandate

Medium

Uncertain[1]

Medium

High

Renewable Fuel Standard

Medium

Uncertain[2]

Medium

Medium

Transportation Pricing – Mileage User Fee[3]

Low

Uncertain

Low

Low

Investment in Public Transit

Low

Uncertain[4]

Low

High

Public Benefit Fund

Medium

Positive

High

High

Property Assessed Clean Energy

Low

Positive

High

High

Marine Fuel Conservation

Low

Positive

Medium

Medium

Feed-in-Tariff

Low

Negative

High

Medium

Offshore Wind and Ocean Power

Medium

Uncertain

High

High

Landfill Methane Capture

Low

Negative

Medium

Low

a The financial impact to consumers and businesses is dependent on how the revenues were used, and highly dependent upon revenue utilization

b RGGI program has demonstrated real result by applying revenues to enhance opportunity for new jobs and infrastructure in clean tech and efficiency

CLEW Task 2 Final – Outside WA Policies


[1] ZEV requires significant state and individual investment. However, ZEVs provide a payback to consumers over time based on cheaper per-mile equivalent price of electricity relative to gasoline.

[2] Recent State data show that biodiesel unit cost is less than conventional diesel, however there are implementation costs and potential availability issues may have cost implications.

[3] GHG and economic impacts of MBUF policy greatly depend on design and implementation as a GHG strategy. It would presumably create the much needed revenue for transportation infrastructure as a gas-tax replacement.

[4] Major investments would increase service and lower fares, which would have a positive impact on riders; however increased subsidies would likely require raising taxes, which would negatively impact tax payers.



[1] Washington’s 2008 Climate Action Team

24
Sep

Halosource Announces New Marketing Director and Senior Director of Public Affairs in Press Release

HaloSource

9-10-13

SeaKlear® Taps STEELE to lead Marketing Team

Alex Steele

Alex Steele, Marketing Director

SeaKlear® water treatment products, manufacturers of a complete line of eco-friendly water treatment products for both pools and spas, is excited to announce the expansion of its marketing group with the addition of Alex Steele as the company’s new Marketing Director.  Ms. Steele will assume responsibility for developing and executing Marketing Activation Plans for SeaKlear and define the marketing activities that drive sales growth.  Ms. Steele brings a wealth of experience in this important area from her years of experience in business development and marketing of consumer packaged goods and most recently running her own marketing consulting business focused on environmentally friendly ‘green’ companies.   A native of Argentina and Spanish-speaker, Ms. Steele is excited to interact with the diversity of dealers in the pool and spa industry.  Ms. Steele is supported by Ms. Tricia Testa and industry veteran, Terry Arko. “We are focused on building capacity, strength and execution in our Brand Marketing by making strong connections with customers and consumers,” says Ms. Steele. Alex Steele can be reached at asteele@halosource.com.

9-23-13

HaloSource/ SeaKlear® Promotes Bovey

Kate Bovey

Kate Bovey, Sr. Director of Public Affairs

HaloSource, the parent company of SeaKlear® eco-friendly water treatment products for both pools and spas, is excited to announce it has promoted Kate Bovey to step into an important new role of Senior Director of Public Affairs for the entire Halosource organization.  Kate has been overseeing marketing at HaloSource since February 2012, and her new role in creating a Public Affairs function for the company is an extension of her work developing a company ‘voice’ and telling the story of Halosource and its brands.  Kate’s new role will tie together several broad areas including, investor relations, public relations, corporate social responsibility, thought leadership and the continuing evolution of the company’s web and social media presence.  “HaloSource is in the business of making water better – whether you drink it, play in it or return it safely to the environment.  As a clean water technology company, we have a powerful story to tell,“ says Bovey.  Kate’s team is rounded out by Justin Howard. Kate can be reached at kbovey@halosource.com.  

17
Sep

US Solar Market Insight Report 2013 Q2

Key Findings in the Solar Market Insight Report 2013

Photovoltaics (PV and CPV)

  • Photovoltaic (PV) installations totaled 832 MW in Q2 2013, up 15% over Q1 2013
  • Cumulative operating PV capacity in the U.S. now stands at 8,858 MW
  • The residential market was flat quarter-over-quarter in Q2, breaking its streak of incremental quarterly growth
  • The non-residential market was down in Q2, continuing a relatively light year for the segment
  • The utility segment completed 38 projects totaling 452 MW; currently, there are an additional 4.1 GW of utility PV under construction
  • We anticipate that 4.4 GW of PV will be installed in 2013, up 30% over 2012
  • The average residential PV system prices fell to $4.81/W, while the average non-residential system price dropped to $3.71/W

Concentrating Solar Power (CSP)

  • Despite zero CSP installations in Q2 2013, we maintain bullish expectations for 2013 with over 900 MWac slated to come on-line by the end of this year
  • BrightSource Energy’s 392 MWac Ivanpah CSP project is on schedule to deliver electricity to the grid in late 2013

 

Read the report here.

 

16
Sep

3 Reasons Why People Are Apathetic to Climate Change

With respect to the science of climate change, many experts regard the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change as the world’s authoritative institution. A draft summary of its forthcoming report was leaked last week describing the panel’s growing confidence that climate change is real, that it is a result of human action, and that if the world continues on its current course, it will face exceedingly serious losses and threats; all of which are conclusions consistent with the panel’s judgments from the past two decades. Why then, have so many nations not done more in response? Three purely psychological reasons why humans do not fear climate change.

1. Climate change is difficult to associate with any particular tragedy or disaster, making it speculative in most people’s minds as a serious risk.

2. There are no obvious devils or demons — no individuals who intend to create the harms associated with climate change, making public outrage much harder to fuel.

3. Human beings are far more attentive to immediate threats than to long-term ones.

In this light, it should not be surprising if people don’t get much exercised by the IPCC’s forthcoming report. All the obstacles are daunting but the world is unlikely to make much progress on climate change until the barrier of human psychology is squarely addressed.

Read the original article here.

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